Berlin travel-Wall’s East Side Gallery

East Side Gallery, Berlin
The Berlin Wall is probably the starkest visual symbol of the Cold War. It divided the western or “free” part of Berlin from the eastern part that was under East German authoritarian rule until it was famously torn down in 1989, marking the end of the Cold War and the unification of Germany. Some of the wall is kept intact as a memorial and a lesson for future generations to heed. But there is one part of the Wall that serves as a symbol of joy, not sadness. This is the East Side Gallery, a 1.3km section of the wall that is covered by 105 colorful graffiti artwork. There are caricatures, wacky abstract patterns, and fantasy figures.

One of the most well-known graffiti artworks is a kiss between Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev and Erich Honecker, president of East Germany, which was based on a real photo (which I didn’t know before). The graffiti painting actually has its own name “My God, help me to survive this deadly love.” The kiss was known as a socialist fraternal kiss, done by communist leaders as a greeting during the 20th century.

Situated along the river Spree, the East Side Gallery is a very pleasant place to visit, not to mention it is completely free. As a plus, the nearby Oberbaum bridge, on which road traffic and subway trains travel, looks like a medieval castle with its two towers and Gothic style design.
East Side Gallery, Berlin
Iconic kiss painting of the former Soviet and East Germany leaders (they really did do that in real life)
East Side Gallery, Berlin
Berlin
Oberbaum bridge
East Side Gallery, Berlin East Side Gallery, Berlin    East Side Gallery, Berlin

East Side Gallery, Berlin
A truly fitting message for these times
East Side Gallery, Berlin
Not all the colorful artwork was on the wall

Berlin travel- Museum mania

Berlin, Germany

I really like visiting museums, especially those that focus on history and anthropology. Berlin is ideal for museum lovers like myself because of its Museum Island, a cluster of museums on the northern half of an island in the Spree River, right in the middle of the city. Museum Island consists of five museums, each with a different focus and each housed in a magnificent building. For example, the Neues has Egyptian and prehistoric collections, the Pergamon has ancient Middle Eastern artifacts while the Alte Nationalgalerie (Old National Gallery) holds 19th-century artwork.

I didn’t have time to visit all of these museums so I chose the Neues (New) Museum, which despite its name was built in 1859. It’s new compared to the neighboring Altes (Old) Museum was built in 1830. The Neues Museum featured a great Egyptian collection featuring mummies, tombs, papyrus scrolls, and busts of pharaohs, as well as Germanic and Celtic exhibitions.

I also wanted to visit a museum about German history so immediately afterwards, I went to the German Historical Museum, which is just down the road from Museum Island. The museum features cool suits of medieval knight armor and weaponry, medieval paintings of battles and royalty, German cars, as well as World War II posters and newspaper clippings. However, I wasn’t able to see everything since the museum was about to close so I missed out on a few of the exhibits.

Also on Museum Island is the Berlin Cathedral, a neat fortress-like Protestant church with a massive green dome flanked by two smaller green domes. The domes remind me of Orthodox churches and the Kremlin. Built in 1905, the Berlin Cathedral actually isn’t very old and isn’t even a proper cathedral because it’s not the seat of a bishop.

Earlier that day, I had visited a friend in a scenic residential part of town, that had a park with horses and a barn nearby as well as a horseshoe-shaped housing complex. While the inner parts of Berlin, like the one I was staying in, seem rather gritty and gray, the residential neighborhood was like a whole different world. I wish I could have spent longer in Berlin.

Berlin Cathedral
Berlin Cathedral
Museum Island, Berlin
Alte Nationalgalerie

Neues Museum

Berlin
Neues Museum exhibit, Berlin
Berlin, Germany
Ancient elk skeleton, found in Berlin, dating from 10,700 BC!

Altes Museum

Knight on horseback, German National Museum

Berlin, Germany



In a much different part of town, a horse pasture in a residential park

Germany travel-Frankfurt finale

Frankfurt might be better known as a business hub than a tourist hotspot, so not many travelers visit this city, unless they are on a business trip. For me, I was flying back to Taiwan from Frankfurt at the end of my Europe trip so I had to visit Frankfurt. And it wasn’t bad at all. The city, where Germany’s financial sector and stock market are based, has a good modern skyline, one of Europe’s best, located next to the Main river, and the Römerberg, the historic old town center where the Römer, a medieval complex that has been Frankfurt’s City Hall for over 600 years, and several reconstructed, picturesque old houses are located. The reason they were reconstructed is that the original ones were destroyed during World War II. The Römerberg was undergoing renovation when I was there, so the appearance may have changed now.

With over 1,200 years of history and being a major city in the Holy Roman Empire starting from the 9th century AD, Frankfurt has been important for a very long time. In the present, as Germany’s financial center, as well as the European Union’s, Frankfurt has one of the most numerous collection of skyscrapers in Europe, including the EU’s second and third highest skyscrapers. However these were modest compared to Asia. European cities don’t seem to have too many skyscrapers and the ones they have are not too high. I wonder if this is because of disdain for ultra-tall buildings, a lack of need, or simply building regulations. Anyhow, I liked that European cities didn’t feel crowded or cramped and were very walkable and pleasant. Frankfurt was no different.

As with most major European cities, Frankfurt has a large cathedral as well as a pedestrian shopping street that was still busy on an early weekday night. The cathedral (technically not a cathedral but it is still called one since it was used for the election and coronation of Holy Roman Emperors) is not that large, but you can pay to climb up the tower for sweeping views of the city and river. I also visited a couple of the city’s major cultural attractions. The great German writer Johanne Wolfganng Goethe was from Frankfurt, and his childhood home is now a museum, an elegant house where the rooms are well preserved and personal belongings show visitors how Goethe grew up (a book about Italy given by his father helped inspired a fondness for Italy and travel for Goethe, who would later visit Italy himself). The Senckenberg Natural History Museum features great collections of fossils and stuffed animals, but the highlight was the numerous dinosaur and mammoth skeletons including the tyrannousarus rex and marine shark-like dinosaurs.

I stayed near the main train station or Hauptbahnhof, in a supposedly rough part of town, but it was very convenient for getting around as well as to the airport, less than 20 minutes away on the subway. If you find yourself in Germany and want to try a new city, give Frankfurt a chance.



The skyscraper with the strange side spire, the Commerzbank Tower, is Germany’s tallest building and the second-tallest in the EU. At right, you can see the Frankfurt Cathedral.

Römer, City Hall since the 1400s

Opposite the Römerberg is the Römer


View of Frankfurt’s business district from the cathedral’s tower

T-rex at Senckenberg Natural History Museum
Continue reading “Germany travel-Frankfurt finale”

Some rare positives in the news

It’s not easy to feel positive these days, with so many bad developments in the world and all around us, but at least this week there have been a few good news. First, the missing youth Thai footballers and their coach have all been rescued from the deep cave where they had been stuck for over two weeks. Far from straightforward, the rescue took three days and involved Thai and foreign divers accompanying the youngsters and coach one by one through over three kilometers of dark, narrow, flooded cave tunnels. The sheer magnitude and complexity of the search and rescue campaign was a heartening example of international cooperation involving Thais and Australians, Americans, British, Japanese and others.

Second is the World Cup, which has been running for the past three weeks and is now at the semifinal stage. It’s been a great tournament, with a lot of shocks and big teams getting knocked out. My favorite team Germany suffered the humiliation of failing to advance from the group stage, the first time since 1938 but the way they were playing, it was actually deserved. The tournament, which is held in Russia this year, has also been relatively free of violence and racism, which many feared would happen, though there were some reporters who got sexually harassed while doing their jobs.

Third is that Liu Xia, the widow of the late Chinese Nobel laureate and activist Liu Xiabo, was finally freed from eight years of house arrest in Beijing and able to leave for Germany. What makes Liu Xia’s imprisonment vile is that she was never accused or charged of any crime.
Hopefully being in a free and democratic country will help her recover from her serious mental and emotional trauma in China. The photo of her in that article I linked to basically says it all. China had been under pressure from the West to release Liu, which is probably why they finally did. However, China promptly sentenced another democracy and human rights activist to another 13 years of prison. Qin Yongmin had spent over two decades in jail and had most recently been arrested in 2015 but only tried in May this year.


Taipei on a very good day

Germany travel- Berlin the bold


Despite being Germany’s biggest city and capital, Berlin, to me, evokes a kind of tough, scrappy, brutish image, both from its past as a divided city during the Cold War and its contemporary image as a inexpensive, start-up paradise. I found this to kind of true when I visited it, as it was old in some parts, but I also found it attractive and more modern than Rome or Paris. As with London and Paris, Berlin was my first-ever stop in its country.

After getting off my budget flight from Rome, I took the airport bus to the station near my “pension,” their word for a cheap kind of inn, which in this case was a set of rooms inside a low-rise apartment. The building was dark at night, had no elevator, and had graffiti painted on the walls of its driveway. Not exactly the most ideal place to stay in. But it was close to the subway, being between two stations, and further up the street, a supermarket with a separate alcohol store next door (perhaps due to local rules). On one of the nights I went there, a group of punks (mohawks, black jackets and all) were hanging out with a couple of pitbulls in the parking lot, which did give me a little bit of trepidation but nothing happened. But yet, the neighborhood was attractive, with a wide expanse of lawn and a neat row of trees separating the block buildings from the sidewalk and main road. It was only the next day I realized there was a distinctive tower with a dome (TV Tower) at the far end of the main road. The neighborhood also had a lot of small businesses like cheap eateries, alcohol stores and clothes stores.

The first place I visited was the Berlin Wall Memorial. The city’s most famous attraction, the Wall exists as a few preserved sections, as it was mostly torn down. The Memorial is right in the midst of a neighborhood built over where the wall stood. As such, the Memorial stretches along several blocks where parks, preserved wall sections with a watchtower, and a small oval church commemorate the wall. Near the end, there is a museum from which you could get a good view of the wall from the top. The setting was so serene, in stark contrast to the harsh reality of the wall which bisected Berlin into an open Western part and the Eastern, Communist section from where people tried to flee to the West. Some of them lost their lives doing so, which is also commemorated. I also visited another more artistic part of the Wall two days later.

I later made my way to the Reichstag, the nation’s parliament that was in a grand, gray building. More specifically, I went to the top of the building, a dome from where you could get good views of the surroundings. It was then a short walk to the Brandenburg Gate, which was smaller than I’d imagined. There were horse carts, street musicians, and even an Iranian protest against their country’s regime going on. I walked to Gendarmenmarkt, where three magnificent buildings – the 18th century Konzerthaus Berlin (Concert Hall) and two 17th century churches (the French and German churches) are lined up in a row. I finished off the day by going to Potsdamer Platz, a confusing mall complex spread across several buildings and basements. The coolest part was Sony Plaza, a circular entertainment building covered by a neon-coloured roof made up of blades that resembled a propeller.

The subway was old, but retro and clean in a charming way, not so much creaky and antique like Paris’, cramped like London’s or dark and dirty like Rome’s. But it was a little confusing (see the system map) because there are so many lines, divided into surface and underground trains- U-Bahn and S-Bahn.

  

Overview of a first-time Europe trip

For many years, I often had to say to people when talking about travelling, “I’ve never been to Europe.” Well, I no longer need to say that because I finally did go to Europe.

Specifically, I went to the UK, France, Italy, and Germany in October. My destinations were mostly cities – London, Paris, Rome, Milan, Berlin – since those are among the most famous places in Europe, plus I like cities, not to mention my lack of familiarity with Europe and my wonky foot meant I couldn’t really do any hiking. I stayed a few full days each in most of the cities so it was not one of those whirlwind, 10-day, 8-city kind of trip. Actually the trip was a little over 3 weeks but it did feel too short. Originally I was planning a shorter and less ambitious trip but then my mother asked to come along (we went to London and Paris, then she went back first) so I extended it and decided to go to Italy.

It was a real eye-opener and I left with a positive impression, that Europe, or at least those countries I went to, despite all the news about struggling economies and old societies, is still very much a beautiful, modern and advanced continent. It was easy to see and feel the history all around, especially in cities like Paris and Rome, which was integrated with modernity in a way that was charming and different from cities in China or Taiwan. The sights were beautiful, the food was great, people were courteous in general, the service was good, despite expectations about supposed French haughtiness which were proven wrong. On the other hand, what was not so charming was the lack of toilets in places like the Louvre or the old subway in Rome. I also had strong concerns about pickpocketers and scammers, which I read a lot of worrying accounts about. I had a few encounters with the latter, but luckily I was unscathed. I should also say it was good to have gone to Paris before the terrorist attack last week, as some things may never be the same security-wise in the short term, with even other countries like Belgium affected.

In short, I found Paris to be the most beautiful city, Rome the most historic and impressive, and London the most modern. Germany was good though I was a little disappointed by certain aspects of society (surly service staff, people walking into you etc). However, I liked each country I went to, and could have easily spent more time in each of them.

I may have missed out on Spain, and Northern and Eastern Europe, but hopefully I will get there another time.

The itinerary
I started off in London, where we stayed for a few days and did a daytrip to Cambridge. Then I took the Eurostar to Paris, stayed for a few days, then moved on to Chambery, a town near the Alps in southern France, by train, stayed one full day, and crossed into Italy by train. I stayed in Milan for two full days, then went to Rome, again by train. After three full days, I flew from Rome to Berlin, stayed for two days, which I admit is too short for that city, then took the train to Frankfurt, stayed one full day, then flew back to Asia.

The highlights

England
London
-I’ve been to a few good museums but the British Museum was pretty impressive, the first of many great museums I’d visit in Europe. It features famous objects like the Rosetta Stone, the Elgin Marbles taken from Greece, and a Egyptian gallery, plus it’s got a cool African section.
-Tower Bridge was attractive, with the Tower of London on one side, while crossing the bridge provides nice views of the river Thames, HMS Belfast, moored lower down the Thames, and London’s weird towers like the Shard and Skygarden.
-Westminster Parliament with neighboring Westminster Abbey were both large, grand buildings
-Trafalgar Square was much livelier than I expected, and the National Art Gallery, which is at the square, was full of nice paintings.
-I’m an Arsenal fan so Emirates Stadium was a great place to visit. As a bonus, it is near one of the oldest and most attractive subway stations I’ve ever seen – red-brick Holloway Road station.
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France
Paris
-The Louvre was great (I only saw about one-third of the exhibits).
-St. Chapelle doesn’t look like much from the outside but inside, it has the most beautiful stained glass windows I’ve ever seen.
-Looking down across Paris from the Montparnasse Tower (it’s much less busier and actually lets you see the Eiffel Tower)
-The Champs-Élysées by itself is not so spectacular but walking on it to reach the Arc de Triomphe was really cool, especially as the avenue becomes more busier the nearer you get to the Arc.
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Italy

Rome
-The Colosseum is magnificent, but the neighboring Forum ruins are more interesting and the neighboring (all three are right next to each other) Palatine Hill lets you have a good view of the Forum.
-The Piazza Navone is a large, beautiful square surrounded by attractive buildings, restaurants and a large church. It is in the middle of a historic district with the Pantheon just east of it.
-The Castel Sant’Angelo (St. Angel’s Castle) is a round Roman imperial fortress that overlooks the river Tiber and the Vatican.
-Vatican Museums feature so much great art that it was almost too much for me to take in. There were impressive sculptures of Roman emperors, huge masterpieces and fantastic painted ceilings, such as the Sistine Chapel’s painted by the great Michelangelo.
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Milan
-Milan’s main attraction, the massive Duomo cathedral, is an impressive sight both inside and outside and on top. The cathedral is next to the Galleria Vittorio Emmanuele II, an open-air luxury mall which is strikingly beautiful.
-Castello Sforzesco (Sforza Castle) is a formidable 15th century castle that serves as a museum. It’s actually a collection of mini-museums ranging from art to furniture and also features Michelangelo’s last project, an unfinished sculpture of the Virgin Mary holding Jesus.
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Germany

Berlin
-German historical museum is only two floors but is full of interesting exhibits and paintings that range from the Middle Ages to German reunification. It also has World War II items such as Nazi posters and newspapers about the Allied victory.
-Gendermenmarkt is a square flanked by the three awesome old buildings – the Konzerthaus (Concert Hall) and the French and German churches.
-Berlin Cathedral is one of the most attractive cathedrals I’ve ever seen. Its green dome-shaped roofs make it different from all the tall, stern, rectangular cathedrals you see all over Europe.
-East Side Gallery is an over 1km-long stretch of the Berlin Wall that is covered with crazy and beautiful graffiti “masterpieces.”
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Frankfurt
-Romer is a historic square that features distinctive picturesque traditional wooden buildings.
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