Taiwan

Taipei travel and farewell (again)

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When I moved to Hong Kong in March, I said goodbye to Taipei for a second time. But unlike the first time when I moved to Beijing, my move this time happened abruptly and deliberately because I’d been job-searching from Taiwan and decided to move once I’d gotten an offer. Coincidentally I’m writing this from Taipei, which I went back to for the Labor Day weekend. But whether it’s because I only left only two months later, or because Hong Kong is close to Taipei and arguably more developed, I don’t feel as much relief or gladness to be back. Taipei seems very quiet (admittedly it was rainy and I stay in a peaceful residential area) and a bit dreary compared to noisy, crowded Hong Kong.

Anyways, before I left for Hong Kong, I went to a few places I hadn’t been to.

A monument to one of Taiwan’s worst tragedies, the 228 Peace Memorial Park occupies a spot right in the middle of Taipei, next to the NTU Hospital and near Taipei Train Station. The 228 incident in 1947 resulted in several thousand, perhaps even over 10,000 as the actual death toll is not known, civilians were killed by ROC soldiers in an effort to contain disturbances sparked by a riot over a vendor being arrested and beaten. The mass killing was covered up for decades until finally the government publicly addressed it in the nineties and later declared a public holiday to commemorate it. The monument features a steel sculpture of two mounted cubes mounted on their edges and fused together facing a large concrete structure featuring two blocks also fused together crowned by a towering steel spire. In the midst of the concrete structure is an underground fountain that flows downward.

See further down for Ximending and Huashan Creative Park.

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NTU Hospital, one of the city’s better hospitals. This is the old wing, which was built under Japanese occupation in the early 20th century.
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Shin Kong Life tower, the second-highest tower in Taipei

Ximending
This is a busy shopping and entertainment area that is popular with young people. I don’t usually come here (the last time being when I was a university student visiting Taiwan) but I had to go to the nearby Immigration Department for paperwork so I decided to go here out of curiosity. The area features the Red House, a renovated historic building that is full of artist shops.
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Art for this age- a statue of two youngsters taking selfies. It’d be meta to take a selfie in front of it.
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Huashan 1914 Creative Park
This art park used to be a winery that was built in the early 20th century. It’s got theaters, galleries, shops and an upside-down house, which you can see for yourself below.
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4 thoughts on “Taipei travel and farewell (again)

  1. Is it easy for you to travel between HK and Taipei? I see that you had to go to immigration, but since you quickly started working in HK after being in Taipei, it doesn’t seem like you had to go through a lot of trouble. I also really like that upside down house in your photos!

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    1. Yes, it is relatively easy for to travel between HK and Taiwan. I was born in HK so I’m able to work there without requiring a work permit.
      That upside down house was pretty cool though I now regret not going inside.

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  2. Huashan 1914 park looks great! I was quite busy last time, but I plan to be in Taipei more and more in the future and that’s on my to-do list…

    Personally, the quietness of Taiwan is growing on me as opposed to the crowds in Hong Kong.

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    1. Hope you get to visit it next time. I’m the opposite; I think the quietness is good at times but I feel Taipei could do with more energy and bustle.

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